Meaning of death—casshern sins 2

Don't you just hate it when girls do that.

Don't you just hate it when girls do that.

Casshern Sins has finally not disappointed me in a disturbing but at the same time enlightening way. The issue of death is revisited from the context of robots who were once immortal but are now forced to embrace death, or ruins in robotic terms.

If you can ask this question, you are.

If you can ask this question, you are.

The episode actually started in quite a positive light with the robots Wrench and Root exhibiting traits that were as human as any real human could be. Death to them only made them treasure their time together so much more. The rest of the robot village were in the same way too, enjoying each other’s company to the last second of their existence with one of the robots juggling for the crowd until he was no longer. Dying still sucked, but the fear of it led them to do well with what limited time they had left.

More human than most real human

More human than most real human

Then the episode turned really dark with the ugliest aspect of humanity storming in. Their rejection of death also meant their rejection of the true spirit of humanity that death offered. To avoid physical death was to accept spiritual death.

and in turn became a zombie.

and in turn became a zombie.

What came next was nothing other than violence begetting violence. Little robot kids holding shard of glass, lover turned hater trading vows of passion with thirst of blood. Seeing Casshern ripping their guts out evoked not only horror but also pity. Yet at the same time, these robots, after the decision they had made, were not to be pitied. Truly scary.

This horrific scene had justified for me the gore that Casshern Sins had featured so far, showing the rawness and ruthlessness of the darker aspect of humanity.

The promise of eternal life is also the certainty of immediate destruction.

The promise of eternal life is also the certainty of immediate destruction.

To take this episode to a deeper level, you can say that perhaps it was the hope, be it real or not, of diverting death that was the trigger for the atrocious act. The robots did not turn blood thirst until Casshern revealed his name. And it didn’t matter rather or not the promise of devouring him would really avert death or not—the mere hope that it would was enough.

The episode closed with an ironic revelation. Whereas the robots he killed desired eternity, he questioned why he still lived on.

I’m looking forward to see where this story will take.

Death only looks ugly.

Death only looks ugly.

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About bakaneko

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One Response to Meaning of death—casshern sins 2

  1. Panther says:

    Indeed, one wonders how ironic the situation could be, and how quickly the darker aspect of humanity is shown even in robots, who now face the same situation as mortals in this case. Looks like I will be continuing this one for quite a while, and finishing it too.

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